Review: Phineas and Ferb

Oh, the things you can build on a fine summer’s day…

The Lowdown:

Show: Phineas and Ferb

Networks/years aired: Disney Channel/XD, 2007-2015

AniB’s thoughts: I think I know what I’m going to write today! First, a quick shout-out to S.G. of Rhyme and Reason for the request. I was going to review  Phineas and Ferb at some point, but your input helped me to fast track an important, influential, and most of all, fun show up the priority list. (And no, I’ve still got Steins;Gate on the list, don’t worry!) Indeed, Phineas and Ferb‘s very essence lies in the two key parts of every episode: what in fact will the titular characters do everyday of their summer vacation, and to that same end, the question can also be asked of the B-plot always involving Agent P (aka Perry the Platypus) and Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz. What the writers did with that structure though, is nothing short of incredible.

Phineas and Ferb was a terrifically innovative show that continued to hold its own even after other major Western shows emerged post 2010. It combined a bright color palette mixed tastefully with simple animation that worked quite well, an entire catalog’s worth of original songs from every episode, and a consistency that ensured it saw little drop-off in performance, some 8 years after its debut. The last point in particular was very impressive, as these types of episodic shows (albeit one here  that had a loose canon and constantly self-referenced past events) have an unfortunate tendency to usually fall to “seasonal rot”- the term used for a show that’s still chugging out new episodes long after it should have been put out to pasture. Nickelodeon has two perfect examples- SpongeBob SquarePants and The Fairly Odd Parents are still airing new episodes in 2017; they are both long past the point of being innovative or even relevant- relics of about 3 eras back. To further illustrate this point, what era are all the SpongeBob memes from? (Hint: try pre-2004.) Even The Simpsons, which most critics tend to fawn over its amazing run in the 1990’s, has become a victim of this symptom; the only animated show still in production on the planet with a starting point in the 1980’s, it’s become staid for what it was. Back to Phineas and Ferb, another major reason it was able to avoid this problem was a creator-driven ending that felt natural, and a simple story structure that allowed major flexibility in where the show-runners could go with it. In that sense, Phineas and Ferb reminded me of Codename: Kids Next Door– it was only a matter of how big and crazy the writer’s ideas could go, all wrapped up neatly when it was time.

The show also contained some pretty great specials; in particular, its parody story of Star Wars was brilliantly done; while the events of the original movie still went on, it was still a uniquely crafted Phineas and Ferb story using the backdrop of Star Wars, with plenty of clever references that even I was surprised how on-point they were- and it worked beautifully! (The best nod had to be that they made fun of Jar Jar unironically. And Greedo shot first.) There was also the Marvel special, and the finale episode it itself was a special. (Kudos to Agent P- somehow after the entire show’s run, Phineas and Ferb never caught onto his secret identity- movie nonwithstanding.) I was often amazed at how clever the writing was in this show, and before Gravity Falls took the mantle of “biggest Disney TV cartoon airing” sometime in 2014 (in my personal opinion), it had been Phineas and Ferb that had really nailed the appeal to all audiences amazingly well. Was it a perfect show? Well, no- but its cultural impact (which isn’t a factor in grading) and precedents it set for other Western animation is undeniable. There’s also a high degree of re-watchability, and the fact that it’s also an extraordinarily easy show to pick up- because it’s also a case of where “simple” is better in animation. On to the grading:


 

Animation Quality: Traditional 2-D animation. Bright, vibrant and with an unmistakably simple touch, Phineas and Ferb’s animation pops with an eye pleasing color palette and easy character designs that while rather straight forward, are aesthetically pleasing. 4/5 points.

 
Characterization: Featuring the titular main characters, their big sister Candace, some close friends, Agent P and Dr. Doofenshmirtz, the show had a lovable main cast.

Phineas Flynn is the main protagonist; sporting a tuft of orange hair on top of his pointy head, he is a constantly upbeat boy with a genius intellect and creative mind to match. With his catchphrase (“Ferb, I think I know what we’re going to do today!”) he is the main driver behind all the major inventions seen in the show, which in turn he usually loves to share with his brother, friends, and even strangers depending on the setting.

Ferb Fletcher is Phineas’ stepbrother; he is English and speaks far less frequently, but is very close to the former and also has an intellect and creativity to match. Ferb often ist the one making timely quips, and is a equal partner in all the brothers’ summer endeavors.

Candace Flynn is the biological sister of Phineas and stepsister of Ferb. A typical teenage girl, her favorite activity over the summer is her numerous attempts to “bust the boys,” meaning to catch them in the act of doing something extreme, which as a running gag, always fails (with the exception of one time, but that has a caveat all its own.) She has a major crush on Jeremy Johnson, who in turn sees Candace as a good friend. She’s often seen as paranoid because of her failed busting attempts, but ultimately loves her brothers.

On the flip side, Agent P (aka Perry the Platypus) and Dr. Doofenshmirtz are arch-rivals in the tied in B-plot of every episode. Perry is an anthropomorphic platypus who is in deep cover as the Flynn-Fletcher family’s pet; in reality he’s a secret agent working for the agency O.W.C.A. with the assignment of thwarting Doofenshmirtz. He wears a fedora in action.

Dr. Doofenshmirtz is an incompetent evil scientist who actually makes very effective evil machines (known as “-inators” through the series), but always misapplies his creations, leading to his constant defeat. He’s actually a decent guy and not really that evil; over the series he and Perry actually become “frienemies” of sorts, as their daily routines rely on one another. He also has a daughter (Vanessa).

Finally, Phineas and Ferb have three friends that make consistent appearances: Isabella, a kind, bright girl who leads a Fireside Girls Troop and is their next-door neighbor and best friend; she and Phineas have actual feelings for each other (though it’s in a puppy-love kind of way at this point…), her catchphrase is “Whatcha doing?” (which is actually her first line in the series. Baljeet is an Indian-American boy who absolutely loves school to the point that he signed up for numerous summer classes; he also possesses a genius mind but is very high strung about his grades. Finally there’s Buford; while he’s a self-proclaimed bully, he’s invited along on Phineas and Ferb’s summer adventures to the point that he’s actually good friends with all of them, particularly Baljeet. He’s fa rmore sensitive that his initial appearance and actions suggest, and in a friend group that featured a variety of talented personalities, he’s often the straight man.

The other supporting crew was solid as well; the dual story lines of whatever the brothers were doing alongside Agent P’s and Doofenshmirtz’s exploits made for a very Loony Tunes-esque feel. 4.25/5 points.

 
Story quality: Episodic, but extremely inventive. The show’s writers did a great job of keeping the formula original through the show’s run, with original scenarios, smart references and allusions, and a savvy sense of humor. The consistency in structure worked to the show’s advantage- and it was a fun exercise to see how the writer riffed on what could have easily become very cliche and boring (i.e. Doofenshmirtz commenting on how he literally expects and waits for Perry every day.) 4/5 points.

 
Themes: More than anything, Phineas and Ferb focuses on the possibilities of imagination and invention, as well as family, friendship, and the total encapulation of one’s summer vacation. To that end, it’s well done, if not particularly super deep. But it’s sure a lot of fun. 3.75/5 points.

 
Don’t insult the viewer: Clever and inventive, Phineas and Ferb is a fun show with no objectionable material. Most impressive was the incredible amount of original scores produced for the show, episode by episode, and it created a slice-of life musical in a lot of ways- very unique! 5/5 points.

 

Total Score: 21/25 (84%): Emerging in a era when the major animation networks experienced a few years of downturn, Phineas and Ferb shone like a bright light. Carrying the torch for Disney Channel until 2015, it has been a critical and commercial success. As a show, it’s certainly a lot of fun and hits the mark; it’s definitely one to check out.


Like what you read? Wondering if your summer vacations can be as crazy as this one? Leave a comment!

Author: anibproductions

I am the founder and writer of AniB Productions, currently a fledgling blog with a focus on animated shows from both the East and the West. Love Buffalo sports, good political discussion, and an interesting conversation wherever I go.

4 thoughts on “Review: Phineas and Ferb”

  1. I always appreciated Phineas and Ferb for being a reliably entertaining show, for lack of a better description. I could turn on Disney at anytime, find Phineas and Ferb airing and could watch it knowing that it would at least be decent. The show probably could have run another few years and I don’t think people would have complained too much . . . though I think by the time it ended I think it’s constant presence on TV was starting to grate on people so it ended at probably the best time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely. I noted that the showrunners’ decision to end what had become a veritable merchandising empire on the side was the right choice, especially as other series emerged on Disney X.D. Its consistently good quality stands out to me, and it actually has some pretty clever writing.

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  2. Thanks for reviewing another of my favorites! As you said, the consistently innovative ways they mixed up the formula were always so fun and funny. I can just imagine Povenmire and Marsh pitching this idea and trying to convince some Disney executive that it could work. It’s simple yet complicated at the same time with its parallel stories, yet it rarely lost its rhythm.
    I do think there were times the music and stories were in danger of growing stale, mainly toward the end, but its general likability never wavered. They easily could have made Phineas into a jerkish foil for Candace, but the fact that he never intentionally resisted her busting and even helped her a lot was a rare character trait.
    I especially love all those inside jokes too, like someone commenting about how every character had to get the chance to ask “Where’s Perry?” Plus, I’m convinced that Marsh and Povenmire are musical geniuses for coming up with one or more songs for every single episode in every conceivable genre. I’m sad it’s ended, but at least it went out on its own terms, like Gravity Falls did. That’s the best way for any series to end.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re welcome! What they did with the framework of the show from episode #1 was nothing short of remarkable, and I think they just about exhausted every possibility when they did decide to sign off. There was that danger of growing stale, and I do think Marsh and Povenmire knew it; they probably didn’t want to let their baby become a zombie show (like some of the ones I mentioned in the review), and obviously, they had a clear idea how to end it as well, which worked out nicely. I’ll agree about Phineas- he never had any real animosity towards Candace, often expressed that he wished she’d be there for their fun, and he did help her quite a bit…he was consistently upbeat without it being forced, if that makes sense. The inside jokes were great and showed a strong awareness of both the show’s audience and the progression of the show itself; and the amount and depth of music is truly astounding. Like all good shows, there’s bitter-sweetness that it’s ended, but joy that it’ll be preserved on a good note and with a satisfying conclusion.

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