2nd Top 10 Shows Listing

It’s the end of April, and 19 shows are on the board. Time for a refresher!

Well, I haven’t been writing that much lately, but with the end of April upon us, it seemed like a good time to update “the top 10.” This is strictly based on grades; note the top 5 are all so closely graded any of them really could be #1! All the reviews are linked to their shows here as well.

 

T1. Avatar: The Last Airbender (98%)

T1. Gravity Falls (98%)

T2. Cowboy Bebop (97%)

T2. Hunter x Hunter (97%)

T2. Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood (97%)

6. Young Justice* (93%)

7. The Legend of Korra (85%)

T8. Codename: Kids Next Door (84%)

T8. Phineas and Ferb (84%)

T8. Dragon Ball Z (84%)

Dropped out: Neon Genesis Evangelion (81%), Fanboy and Chum Chum (9%)

Just missed: Rurouni Kenshin (82%), Ben 10 (81%), Evangelion.

NOTE: “*” denotes a preliminary review.

Once again, 97% and 98% is splitting hairs. I’d say any of those shows have a legitimate claim for the top spot. (It also goes without saying they’re worth a watch!) For a refresher of what the first Top 10 looked like after only 10 reviews, click here.


Still not seeing a show you’re hoping to see here? Agree or disagree? Leave a comment!

On Animation Channels and Decision-Making, Pt. 3: Disney Channel/XD

The House of Mouse’s TV animation has had some big successes.

Welcome to the 3rd part in a mini-series about  networks and their decision-making when it comes to animated shows! In part 2, Nickelodeon was discussed; the network’s unwillingness to part with its past and lack of quality depth has translated to a 2010’s with few major successes. Now it’s time to turn to another archrival who’s arguably coming on stronger than either Nickelodeon or Cartoon Network: Disney.

Just what is in the water at the house that Walt built these days for the animation units? Walt Disney Animation just won their 3rd Oscar in 4 years, and Disney Television animation (which are the people behind the network(s) in question today) are doing incredibly well with their fare on Disney X.D. Gravity Falls was a boon, setting rating records for its finale just over a year ago; Twilight of the Apprentice, the season 2 finale of Star Wars Rebels one-upped that, and another show that I just reviewed after its season finale- Star vs. The Forces of Evil– is renewed for a 3rd and 4th season. If all this is news to you, hopefully this look behind the scenes will illustrate the sort of path Disney X.D.’s charting at the moment.

A quick look back at the move into the decade for Disney reveals a network that had done modestly well in animation through the 2000’s, with shows like Kim Possible and American Dragon: Jake Long. At this time, the network still split its animated series between flagship station Disney Channel and the smaller Toon Disney; in 2009 the latter was shut down and re-branded as Disney X.D., a decision that would have some major impacts on the animated shows being produced. Speaking of shows, the story for the decade in question begins in 2008, when the network debuted what would both prove to be an anchor show and a transitional one as well- Phineas and Ferb. With the Great Recession hammering the industry- a common thread for all the networks discussed, the show’s strong-creator driven style, consistent quality, and universally strong appeal that performed well in spite of the financial climate meant it would not only be a majorly influential show for the company, but the industry on the whole. What Phineas and Ferb did was start laying the groundwork for a period of animation on TV not seen from the House of Mouse since the early 90’s- and with the potential to surpass it, if it hasn’t already. (Check out my review of Phineas and Ferb for more thoughts!)

The start of the decade saw Disney with an established anchor show (Phineas and Ferb), and one of the earliest offerings was the mediocre Fish Hooks, which despite having a great deal of established and future talent on the staff, such as Tom Warburton (KND/Pepper Ann) and Maxwell Atoms (Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy) didn’t ever quite take off. However, the creative director of that show just so happened to jump up to his first show-running job in 2012…Alex Hirsch. And with him came Gravity Falls, the first and biggest in the wave of creator-driven series that have come to define Disney’s television animation in this decade. Interestingly, Gravity Falls started as a Disney Channel original series, but after the debut of its second season (Scary-oke), the series moved its home permanently to Disney X.D., a move that in turn has ignited the growth of what had been (and still is, relatively speaking) a niche network. And the hits kept coming: Dave Filoni, who headed up Star Wars: The Clone Wars launched the successful Star Wars Rebels after the acquisition of Lucasfilm by Disney, where it has become a key show; while 2015 finally said goodbye to Phineas and Ferb, another rose in its place- Daron Nefcy’s Star vs. The Forces of Evil, which apparently the friends of Mickey Mouse love, as it’s already been greenlit for another 2 seasons; and more recently Dan Povenmire and Jeff “Swampy” Marsh who were behind P&F have started another successful endeavor with Milo Murphy’s Law. Creator driven shows, with strong levels of engagement with their audiences, which in turn are quality shows, has been a winning formula.

Of course, there has been misses, like any studio. The bizzare Pickle and Peanut, headed up by Noah Z. Jones (the same guy behind Fish Hooks) might be chief among these in recent memory, and there’s been quite a few other shows that have been lost to the public eye, if they were ever there to begin with (Randy Cunningham: 9th Grade Ninja? Kick Buttowski?) Somehow, I doubt outside of their target audience and hardcore animation nerds that anyone really knows what these shows are, and while Disney has been doing a good job this decade, they’ll need to continue to build depth in order to sustain success. It’s a different problem, but a good one as opposed to some of their competition, and I’d argue one of Disney’s best attributes about their shows (which has been historically true) is that they never run too long. Phineas and Ferb was an exception; 2-3 years tends to be the historical trend, and the animation unit has never gotten too low as a result of consistently overturning their shows for each generation while maintaining a connection to past hits of yesteryear.

2017 continues to look intriguing. The rebooted DuckTales trailer (at the time of this writing) looks incredible, preserving the heart and feeling of the original while giving it a refreshing update and new flair, and the animation is gorgeously unique. Star vs. The Forces of Evili finished its promising second season at the end of February, and Star Wars Rebels continues its 3rd season with a very familiar face to fans of the old Expanded Universe serving as antagonist. The aforementioned Milo’s Murphy Law is off to a good start (and actually stars Weird Al Yankovic as the main character- go figure)  and Disney X.D. specifically has built a bigger viewership base the past few years and more than one show to rely on (and hey, they still do Gravity Falls and Phineas and Ferb re-runs!) There’s a strong path forward that has been forged; and if this era is looked back on as a golden age of animation in the West, Disney might have a lot to do with that.


Like what you see? Do you know I wrote a Gravity Falls review as well? Leave a comment!

First Top 10 for Animated Shows

Ten reviews, ten grades, first listing.

Here at AniB Productions, I’ll be keeping track of all the graded reviews I’ve published so far and every so often give an updated version of this list. Here’s the initial top 10:

  1. Gravity Falls (98%)
  2. Avatar: The Last Airbender (98%)
  3. Cowboy Bebop (97%)
  4. Young Justice* (93%)
  5. The Legend of Korra (85%)
  6. Codename: Kids Next Door (84%)
  7. Dragon Ball Z (84%)
  8. Phineas and Ferb (84%)
  9. Neon Genesis Evangelion (81%)
  10. Fanboy and Chum Chum (9%)

(NOTE: “*” denotes a preliminary review, or a show that is still in progress.)

I’ll just note that technically Gravity Falls and ATLA are tied for first…but among that top 3, it’s splitting hairs.


Have a show you wish to appear on this list? Agree or disagree? Leave a comment!

Review: Phineas and Ferb

Oh, the things you can build on a fine summer’s day…

The Lowdown:

Show: Phineas and Ferb

Networks/years aired: Disney Channel/XD, 2007-2015

AniB’s thoughts: I think I know what I’m going to write today! First, a quick shout-out to S.G. of Rhyme and Reason for the request. I was going to review  Phineas and Ferb at some point, but your input helped me to fast track an important, influential, and most of all, fun show up the priority list. (And no, I’ve still got Steins;Gate on the list, don’t worry!) Indeed, Phineas and Ferb‘s very essence lies in the two key parts of every episode: what in fact will the titular characters do everyday of their summer vacation, and to that same end, the question can also be asked of the B-plot always involving Agent P (aka Perry the Platypus) and Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz. What the writers did with that structure though, is nothing short of incredible.

Phineas and Ferb was a terrifically innovative show that continued to hold its own even after other major Western shows emerged post 2010. It combined a bright color palette mixed tastefully with simple animation that worked quite well, an entire catalog’s worth of original songs from every episode, and a consistency that ensured it saw little drop-off in performance, some 8 years after its debut. The last point in particular was very impressive, as these types of episodic shows (albeit one here  that had a loose canon and constantly self-referenced past events) have an unfortunate tendency to usually fall to “seasonal rot”- the term used for a show that’s still chugging out new episodes long after it should have been put out to pasture. Nickelodeon has two perfect examples- SpongeBob SquarePants and The Fairly Odd Parents are still airing new episodes in 2017; they are both long past the point of being innovative or even relevant- relics of about 3 eras back. To further illustrate this point, what era are all the SpongeBob memes from? (Hint: try pre-2004.) Even The Simpsons, which most critics tend to fawn over its amazing run in the 1990’s, has become a victim of this symptom; the only animated show still in production on the planet with a starting point in the 1980’s, it’s become staid for what it was. Back to Phineas and Ferb, another major reason it was able to avoid this problem was a creator-driven ending that felt natural, and a simple story structure that allowed major flexibility in where the show-runners could go with it. In that sense, Phineas and Ferb reminded me of Codename: Kids Next Door– it was only a matter of how big and crazy the writer’s ideas could go, all wrapped up neatly when it was time.

The show also contained some pretty great specials; in particular, its parody story of Star Wars was brilliantly done; while the events of the original movie still went on, it was still a uniquely crafted Phineas and Ferb story using the backdrop of Star Wars, with plenty of clever references that even I was surprised how on-point they were- and it worked beautifully! (The best nod had to be that they made fun of Jar Jar unironically. And Greedo shot first.) There was also the Marvel special, and the finale episode it itself was a special. (Kudos to Agent P- somehow after the entire show’s run, Phineas and Ferb never caught onto his secret identity- movie nonwithstanding.) I was often amazed at how clever the writing was in this show, and before Gravity Falls took the mantle of “biggest Disney TV cartoon airing” sometime in 2014 (in my personal opinion), it had been Phineas and Ferb that had really nailed the appeal to all audiences amazingly well. Was it a perfect show? Well, no- but its cultural impact (which isn’t a factor in grading) and precedents it set for other Western animation is undeniable. There’s also a high degree of re-watchability, and the fact that it’s also an extraordinarily easy show to pick up- because it’s also a case of where “simple” is better in animation. On to the grading:


 

Animation Quality: Traditional 2-D animation. Bright, vibrant and with an unmistakably simple touch, Phineas and Ferb’s animation pops with an eye pleasing color palette and easy character designs that while rather straight forward, are aesthetically pleasing. 4/5 points.

 
Characterization: Featuring the titular main characters, their big sister Candace, some close friends, Agent P and Dr. Doofenshmirtz, the show had a lovable main cast.

Phineas Flynn is the main protagonist; sporting a tuft of orange hair on top of his pointy head, he is a constantly upbeat boy with a genius intellect and creative mind to match. With his catchphrase (“Ferb, I think I know what we’re going to do today!”) he is the main driver behind all the major inventions seen in the show, which in turn he usually loves to share with his brother, friends, and even strangers depending on the setting.

Ferb Fletcher is Phineas’ stepbrother; he is English and speaks far less frequently, but is very close to the former and also has an intellect and creativity to match. Ferb often ist the one making timely quips, and is a equal partner in all the brothers’ summer endeavors.

Candace Flynn is the biological sister of Phineas and stepsister of Ferb. A typical teenage girl, her favorite activity over the summer is her numerous attempts to “bust the boys,” meaning to catch them in the act of doing something extreme, which as a running gag, always fails (with the exception of one time, but that has a caveat all its own.) She has a major crush on Jeremy Johnson, who in turn sees Candace as a good friend. She’s often seen as paranoid because of her failed busting attempts, but ultimately loves her brothers.

On the flip side, Agent P (aka Perry the Platypus) and Dr. Doofenshmirtz are arch-rivals in the tied in B-plot of every episode. Perry is an anthropomorphic platypus who is in deep cover as the Flynn-Fletcher family’s pet; in reality he’s a secret agent working for the agency O.W.C.A. with the assignment of thwarting Doofenshmirtz. He wears a fedora in action.

Dr. Doofenshmirtz is an incompetent evil scientist who actually makes very effective evil machines (known as “-inators” through the series), but always misapplies his creations, leading to his constant defeat. He’s actually a decent guy and not really that evil; over the series he and Perry actually become “frienemies” of sorts, as their daily routines rely on one another. He also has a daughter (Vanessa).

Finally, Phineas and Ferb have three friends that make consistent appearances: Isabella, a kind, bright girl who leads a Fireside Girls Troop and is their next-door neighbor and best friend; she and Phineas have actual feelings for each other (though it’s in a puppy-love kind of way at this point…), her catchphrase is “Whatcha doing?” (which is actually her first line in the series. Baljeet is an Indian-American boy who absolutely loves school to the point that he signed up for numerous summer classes; he also possesses a genius mind but is very high strung about his grades. Finally there’s Buford; while he’s a self-proclaimed bully, he’s invited along on Phineas and Ferb’s summer adventures to the point that he’s actually good friends with all of them, particularly Baljeet. He’s fa rmore sensitive that his initial appearance and actions suggest, and in a friend group that featured a variety of talented personalities, he’s often the straight man.

The other supporting crew was solid as well; the dual story lines of whatever the brothers were doing alongside Agent P’s and Doofenshmirtz’s exploits made for a very Loony Tunes-esque feel. 4.25/5 points.

 
Story quality: Episodic, but extremely inventive. The show’s writers did a great job of keeping the formula original through the show’s run, with original scenarios, smart references and allusions, and a savvy sense of humor. The consistency in structure worked to the show’s advantage- and it was a fun exercise to see how the writer riffed on what could have easily become very cliche and boring (i.e. Doofenshmirtz commenting on how he literally expects and waits for Perry every day.) 4/5 points.

 
Themes: More than anything, Phineas and Ferb focuses on the possibilities of imagination and invention, as well as family, friendship, and the total encapulation of one’s summer vacation. To that end, it’s well done, if not particularly super deep. But it’s sure a lot of fun. 3.75/5 points.

 
Don’t insult the viewer: Clever and inventive, Phineas and Ferb is a fun show with no objectionable material. Most impressive was the incredible amount of original scores produced for the show, episode by episode, and it created a slice-of life musical in a lot of ways- very unique! 5/5 points.

 

Total Score: 21/25 (84%): Emerging in a era when the major animation networks experienced a few years of downturn, Phineas and Ferb shone like a bright light. Carrying the torch for Disney Channel until 2015, it has been a critical and commercial success. As a show, it’s certainly a lot of fun and hits the mark; it’s definitely one to check out.


Like what you read? Wondering if your summer vacations can be as crazy as this one? Leave a comment!