Hunter x Hunter’s Chimera Ant arc is finally getting an English dub

It’s about time- A brief history of HxH’s longest arc.

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A few months back, I wrote excitedly about the fact that Greed Island for the first time was receiving an English dub, despite existing in some anime form since at least the early 2000’s. However, this might be even bigger…

An arc considered by many serious fans of the Hunter x Hunter manga and anime to be one of the finest not only in the show, but also across the genre, is finally on the verge of being dubbed. Very early Sunday morning will mark the beginning of the longest arc in the series airing in English on Toonami in the United States, and for those who haven’t seen it- buckle up, you’re in for a ride.

As with the Greed Island piece, here’s a brief history of the Chimera Ant arc:

2003: As the original HxH anime continued on with its set of Greed Island OVAs’, Yoshirio Togashi released the beginning of the arc in the manga on October 8th- which coupled with the frequent hiatuses of the series, would result in it lasting until April 2012- nearly 9 years!

2011: The Hunter x Hunter reboot (and the series mostly talked about) begins. At this point, the Chimera Ant arc is not complete yet in the manga, let alone the anime.

2013: Roughly a year after the manga finished the arc, the anime begins its version of it, marking the first new animated Hunter x Hunter story part since Greed Island’s OVAs finished in 2004. The arc would run into early summer of 2014.

2017: With the conclusion of Greed Island’s first ever English dub, the Chimera Ants will finally be heard in English on the Sunday of this writing (12/10/17 for posterity.)


As it stands, it’s rather difficult to talk too much at length about this very long and detailed arc without major spoilers for those watching for the first time, but the places in which the story goes during the next 60 episodes crosses the ranges of human emotions and psychology in ways shonen anime rarely, if ever does. It will be interesting to hear the VA choices for several characters, including the duo in the picture for this article, and with the shift in the story, it should really test the abilities of the dub actors to capture the same depth and intensity as the original VA’s.

Overall, there’s a lot to be excited about- and in many ways, it’s like an early Christmas present. Here’s hoping for both long-time fans and newcomers alike the English experience of the Chimera Ants is unforgettable.

Finally, here’s the very nice ending theme of the arc, but in 8-bits:

(I’ll leave the full version for the newcomers to discover. Credit to Studio Megaane for the track.)


Like what you see? Any more thoughts on Hunter x Hunter? Leave a comment!

Review: Mob Psycho 100

As quirky as its name sounds.

The Lowdown:

Show: Mob Psycho 100

Studio/ years aired: Bones, 2016

AniB’s thoughts: It’s been a while since my last review, but I’m following up one Bones production (My Hero Academia) with another one in Mob Psycho 100. Despite coming from the same production studio, they are markedly different shows, and this one in particular can be be described as “quirky.”

Mob’s a show that certain audiences will eat right up, and another subset will find it off-putting. Its characteristic animation style is somewhat befitting in a world of “espers”- powerful psychics that possess extraordinary abilities at the highest levels- and if Mob’s face looks somewhat familiar to fans of One Punch Man, it’s from the same creator.

This anime was another watch that I was completely unsure of what I’d find on the other side, but it proved to have a unique aesthetic that was fitting for what it wanted to do as a show. Its characteristic spontaneity and “weirdness,” per se, is somewhat charming in a way, but can be off-putting as well. However, the most impressive part about Mob Psycho 100 is how surprisingly grounded in reality the titular protagonist’s main goal is (find a purpose in life beyond just his extraordinary powers) and the unpredictable resolutions to the many problems and scenarios that crop in this show.

Overall, I might have expected a bit more from Mob, but it was still a compelling little experience and most importantly, was unique without being pretentious. At the present time, there’s a sense that a season 2 will come along, provided by the unresolved plot points in development upon the season 1 finale, along with some talk that there will in fact be a continuation. For all intensive purposes, this review could wind up being merely a preliminary take on the series, but for now, it will just focus on the 12 episodes that exist without judging on speculation.


 

Animation Quality: 2-D animation. Mob features a unique style with characters that have generally expressive, simple eyes and varying levels of definition, from very simple designs like Mob himself to that of the Body Improvement Club (a club at his school) that have incredibly well defined musculature, as an example. The range and style of different techniques is worth noting, and does a good job helping to set the mood, while conveying the story. Finally, fight scenes pack a punch and properly convey the power each combatant in ways that are both eye-catching and easy enough to follow.  4/5 points.

 

Characterization:  The titular protagonist, Mob (whose actual name is Shigeyo Kagayama) is an unremarkable looking boy noted for his bowl-cut hair and simple appearance. However, he does possess extraordinarily strong psychic abilities, and within that, also has a “mode” of sorts that can activate under extreme duress, which reflects his usually repressed emotions. Despite Mob being a prodigy, he prefers to look for a purpose in life without relying on said abilities; he treats people kindly and without any sort of ego, and is the protegee/ assistant of Reigen, his “master” (who’s more like a life mentor).

 

Speaking of which, Reigen Arataka is the self-proclaimed “Greatest Psychic” in the world; in reality, he’s a smart con-man who runs a small-time spiritual consulting business, and his assistant is Mob, who helps him with *real* supernatural issues and other smaller tasks, such as paperwork. Despite his inflated ego, Reigen has sound life advice for Mob through the show and is shown to be a quick thinker on his feet and a master debater.

 

Mob’s younger brother is Ritsu, who initially is all the things Mob is not- popular, an honors student and a member of the school council. However, he desperately wishes to have psychic powers awakened above all else, and aside from caring about his big brother, it is the one thing he wishes to gain, even to his own detriment…

 

Teruki Hanazawa, best known as “Teru” in the show, appears as the shadow boss of Black Vinegar Middle School (yes, there’s turf wars.) A powerful Esper himself, Teru winds up challenging Mob in an ill-conceived battle… Popular, charming and smart, Teru’s world changes after his encounter with the titular hero.

 

Finally, there’s Dimple. Initially a power evil spirit controlling a certain group, he was defeated and reduced by Mob down to a weak little remnant. He sticks around, hoping initially to get back his power but winds up helping Mob and his allies as the story progresses.

 

The rest of the supporting cast includes a number of recurring characters with varying amounts of importance in a given episodes, and are often over the top hammy mixed in with more serious sides, demeanor and goals, depending on the cast member or situation. It fits the show’s unusual dynamics rather well; and while the side cast doesn’t get a lot of depth, the main characters are dynamic and receive some interesting developments as they proceed further into the show. It’s an all around solid effort. 4/5 points.

 

 

Story quality: Following the standard story arc progression of most anime, Mob also has a pseudo-episodic quality, with the daily misadventures of Mob and others on the main cast (and also occasionally the supporting cast) proving to be both self-contained stories and parts of a bigger plot that comes together in an impressive final stretch of episodes to end the season.  It’s definitely convoluted, but this show by and large makes it work. 3.75/5 points.

 

 

Themes: In some ways, perhaps the most impressive aspect of Mob Psycho 100 was its exploration of purpose and philosophies of living in the context of the show. Often times, the show would do something undeniably impressive to point out the different gifts and talents of people, never bringing one aspect up as superior to another, and among the main cast, a great deal of searching and understanding occurred through experience, trials and learning that “the grass isn’t always greener” on the the other side. 4/5 points.

 

 

Don’t insult the viewer: Mob’s got a few unnerving scenes, but overall provided a uniquely strange ride that also proved surprisingly hard to stop watching, which is a solid quality to possess in a show. The OP fits the strangeness of the show well, though whether it fits someone’s tastes is variable.  4.75/5 points.

 

 

Total Score: 20.5/25 (82%). As wild as you’d imagine a show featuring a powerful psychic boy would be, Mob Psycho 100 is an often strange but enjoyable journey through its protagonist’s attempts to lead a happy and fulfilling life, complicated by a never resting world of evil spirits, crazy psychics and unseen magic. It’s worth a watch.


Like what you see? Have you watched Mob Psycho 100? Leave a comment!

A Brief Word on John Lassetter, and the recent string of events-

A lot of joy just got sapped from a lot of people.

Normally, animation is an incredible outlet for creativity and an escape of sorts from the harsh realities we experience in the world. The best productions take us to places and locales we could only dream of, with charismatic characters and incredible stories, waiting to unfold. Unfortunately, that facade can still be broken when a man behind much magic for countless minds over the years has been swept up into the ever-growing Pandora’s Box of misconduct in Hollywood that was often suspected, but never dragged out so openly in the public like it is now.

I write about animation, and I’m perfectly capable of shifting to a more serious topic involving my expertise, and I should start by saying this is *not* at all a defense of John Lasseter. If anything, the story just dropped within an hour of me writing this piece, and while the details haven’t emerged fully in all their detail, the fact that he decided to take a leave of absence himself suggests he was trying to get out in front of a landmine that was set to explode. You can read between the lines about what’s going to happen, and while the implications themselves are ugly, there are other parts of the fallout that are huge here as well: the well-being and security of people, specifically women, and what exactly this will mean for the twin titans of Western animation- Pixar and Walt Disney Animation- going forward.

On the former point, it has been said ad nasuem in other places and contexts, but the potential culture of harassment that may have existed at Pixar and perhaps Disney too as a result of Lassester’s actions is unacceptable and downright despicable. I don’t particularly take sides on “gender issues” as our society today defines them, but a safe work environment, free of fear and of backroom tactics is  key in nurturing positive change. In many ways, it seems the “old boys’ club” mentality still exists in workplaces, and what should be rejected as wrong is instead overlooked due to power, status and position. In Lassasster’s case, it does not matter how brilliant an animator or storyboarder he was- the consideration and acknowledgement of real human lives should always come first, in a culture that too often lacks true compassion for others. The latter point in particular is sickening given what Pixar itself stands for in movies- good, wholesome and downright incredible entertainment.

But it’s just that- entertainment. It’s not reality, much as it’s uniquely able to craft realities of its own- and the magic in those many amazing films became a bit tainted today. I’m not suggesting you have to chuck your copy of Toy Story out the window now, but the man influential in forming many a childhood dream and formative in the dominant decade of Pixar to open the early 2000’s has now been swept up in a growing scandal of powerful individuals that should serve as a warning to the values our culture holds and the sort of diligent watchfulness that should be cast upon those in positions of great responsibility.

Finally, this may in fact mark the end of the so-called Lasseter Renaissance at Disney. While a trivial point to the other aspects of this moment in time I’ve reflected on, it is of some importance in an animation context, as Disney had been rolling off hits since the man took over their struggling animation department back in 2008, and Pixar had still produced some fairly good films in the past decade despite the perception that they took a slight step back (which was more about the ridiculously high standard the studio set for itself.) Whatever happens next for these studios now is no longer connected with Lasseter though, but it will be interesting to see how a very promising 2018 turns out now for both Pixar and Disney’s animation studio.

Here’s hoping the truth continues to show itself, and the proper course of action continues to be taken.


Feel free to chime in on this issue, if you wish. Serious dialogue is the mark of a healthy republic.

The World Series, Baseball, and Anime

As the World Series arrives, so does anime’s wacky takes on baseball.

As October looks to finish its final stretch into Halloween, the long and arduous Major League Baseball season is winding down yet again with the crown jewel of the sport: the chance to win the pennant and the World Series! So why in the world is AniB writing about sports on an animation blog? Well, for one, I truly love sports and while the focus of my writing might not be on it primarily, I still avidly root for my teams and follow a great deal of happenings in several leagues. The other reason makes much more sense, that being that several memorable baseball episodes have occurred in some of the anime I’ve watched, and as a result, it might just be quite amusing to see Japan’s take on a sport they really have made their own, despite its Western origins. (Their Little League team won the world championship in Williamsport, PA back in August, and it overall has become an incredibly popular sport there, even producing some MLB stars.) At any rate, we’ll take a look at 3 particularly fun iterations of the game in animation, which we can all partake in, regardless of your feelings (or lack thereof) towards the Astros and Dodgers at the time of this writing. Play ball!

Edo-Period Ballgame? America’s Pastime in Samurai Champloo

Among the many funkier, modern element interwoven into Samurai Champloo, one of the more infamous episodes happens to be this baseball game, in which an American team, comprised of a hilariously overwrought Commodore William Perry and his men, challenge Mugen, Jin and Fu to a exhibition match, presumably to flex off American imperial might and industrial superiority. What ensues is a bizarrely fierce game with the Americans resorting to a number of underhanded tactics against the superior speed and agility of the Champloo crew’s team, and overall, a memorable episode where (brutal) hilarity ensued.

 

 

Challenge Accepted! Assassination Classroom’s Class 3-E against the school’s team

A major theme in Assassination Classroom, which I wrote about here, was the growth of the class collectively in overcoming challenges both individually and as a group, whatever the odds stacked against them- and in this case, the full deck of cards was against them. In a spite-filled exercise, the school’s principal had mandated a game in which the “inferior” 3-E was to have an “exhibition” against the actual baseball team of Kunugigaoka Junior High, and so, behind a highly unorthodox plan of teamwork, their one legit baseball player (who was made a pariah but had skill), and some of that Class 3-E moxie and magic, they have an outing to remember.

(I should note, this is the whole episode, but it’s really very good.)

 

A Battle Between Gods! Dragon Ball Super, episode 70

Our final game is decidedly more absurd than either the supposed largese of the fictional American team in the Edo period, or the improvised tactics of Class 3-E in Assassination Classroom- it’s baseball, Dragon Ball style. That should tell you all you need to know really, but this game is literally issued by a god, and played by Goku and company in an explosive match that predictably, and hilariously, appears to constantly teeter on the brink of disaster despite being billed as a “good will game” between our heros’ Universe 7 and the rivaling Universe 6 (yes, there’s a multiverse in Dragon Ball now, for anyone out of the loop), a fact easily lost between Gods of Destruction, overeager Saiyans, and competitive tensions that run far too high. However, it is the much maligned Yamcha of DBZ misfortune (and Dragon Ball fame) that literally steals the show as the only true baseball player in the motley crew: “taking one for the team” might not be better personified than the beating the poor man takes for victory.

(There’s some slightly better quality clips, but this is the whole game.)

 

As you can clearly see, there’s been quite a few odd, hilarious and offbeat rendition of baseball in anime. Just be thankful it’s not Goku and company playing the World Series, though- or we might be looking at a lot more damage than the runs on the scoreboard. Here’s to an always entertaining World Series, and a few clips that hopefully brought a smile or two.


Like what you see? Are you a big baseball fan? Leave a comment !

 

 

 

 

Preliminary Review: My Hero Academia (Boku no Hero Academia), post season 2

The Lowdown:

Show: My Hero Academia (also often referred to as Boku no Hero Academia)

Studio/years aired: Bones, 2016- present

AniB’s thoughts: First off, happy October to everyone! As with any new beginnings, something had to end, and so the last day of September also saw the conclusion of My Hero Academia’s second season- an action packed season that stretched all the way from April.  It also has been a while since I’ve done one of these pieces, and so perhaps there’s no better way to return than by covering my personal favorite pick of the various anime that I covered over the course of the past summer; one in which I even gave in my initial thoughts on a while ago. With the official conclusion of this cour, it’s now time for the full review process to commence, and I couldn’t be happier to note that the show has continued to impress since those first impressions.

With two seasons of brisk, vibrant material to pick through, as well as a (now) full knowledge of the source manga’s full run, it’s safe to say BnHA is in fact, an incredibly faithful translation of the source material. While I noted this key point in my preliminary thoughts on the show, it mostly works to the benefit of the production (though there have been some complaints about how accurate the flashbacks are too). It’s also safe to say that it’s quickly developed into one of the better shonen productions around, mostly striking a critical balance between storytelling and heated action sequences in just the right fashion.

(SOME SPOILERS HERE: SKIP TO GRADING IF YOU WISH TO AVOID.)

After Season 1’s rousing finale featuring top hero All Might in a no-holds barred fight against the incredibly powerful mutant Noumu, Season 2’s was a much more subtle but no less tense event featuring the ever growing audacity and newfound conviction of Tomura Shigaraki (the major antagonist), and his mentor, the hidden All For One, as a looming threat not just growing but beginning to thrive in the shadows. Along the way, fans were treated to an action packed follow-up that built off the end of the first season, from U.A.’s world famous Sports Festival, to the saga of the so called “hero killer”- Stain.

Something that stands out for My Hero Academia in particular is how wonderfully the aesthetic of the super-powered world it exists in pops, from the snappy designs of the extensive cast, to the wide and varied color palette used that does everything from painting U.A. Academy as bright and clean, to the dingy hideout in which Shigaraki carries out his sinister (and still developing) plans. It was in all likelihood an enormously difficult task to truly keep the feeling of the manga run ingrained in here, and while this preliminary review is specifically focused on the show and its merits, it’s hard not to admire how well the cast came to life in full motion and color.

As for the second season in particular, it brought a good deal of major story lines and arcs to the forefront, along with vibrant new additions to the cast, which had varying roles, and along with the growth in the story came progression for the characters, both in their own paths and powers (5% One For All hype!) but also in the growing sense of unease, which persisted as a constant undercurrent through the season, and sometimes, right out in the open, which was the case with Stain. All this primes Season 3 for another big tonal shift when it comes, and, if the manga is anything to go by, the anime-only viewers are potentially in for a real treat.

Two solid seasons with plenty of standout moments and a few, but not major flaws is always a real positive, and I’m looking forward to how the anime progresses (mostly expecting a continued manga-centric path, but being excellent in its own right.) The bar has been set high; simply put the show has gone beyond thus far, but let’s see if it’s truly… PLUS…ULTRA!!!


Animation Quality: As you might expect from Bones (the people who did Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, the quality of the hand drawn, computer shaded 2-D is on point. Vibrant and faithful to its source material, the fight sequences are beautifully crafted; a wide ranging and immersive color palette brings the world of heroes and villains to life, and it’s all done in a tasteful way that completely enhances the effects of the show at every turn. 5/5 points.

Characterization: BnHA has an extensive cast, but a few core players worth mentioning here specifically, led by the main character of the series, Izuku Midoriya.

Best known as “Deku” (his chosen hero name) from both fans of the show and the actual cast alike, Izuku’s dream of becoming the world’s number one hero is a pipe dream for him in a world where 80% of the population possesses superpowers, (or “Quirks”, as they’re referred to in-universe) and he has none. His life changes though with a chance encounter with the current #1 hero and his idol, All Might- where he is bestowed the powerful “One For All” quirk. Driven by relentless determination and a kind heart, Izuku’s got a lot of crazy in him- jumping into situations with little regard for himself- but he’s also committed to the suddenly steep and difficult journey that piece by piece, unfolds before him.

Speaking of which, All Might serves as a major character in the show, juggling multiple roles as Midoriya’s mentor, his still-extant run as the #1 hero, and a brand-new teaching position at U.A. Academy- the premiere school for training future heroes in the BnHA canon. As a hero, he’s the stereotype of a Silver Age comic book hero on the outside, wielding the awesome power of One For All- but hides his true form as a skinny man with disheveled hair and baggy clothes from all but a few. Despite the huge difference in strength and appearance, All Might is the same on the inside as a steadfast protector of the people and takes seriously his role as the “Symbol of Peace,” so much so that he’s unable to pace himself in his hero work…

Deku’s archrival from childhood is the brash and ill-tempered Katsuki Bakugo (spelled “Bakugou” in the manga). True to his personality, his Quirk allows his sweat to have nitroglycerin-esque properties, which in turn allows him to create localized explosions from the palms of his hands. A prodigy in terms of skill, his persistently foul moods mask to many his brilliance or his undying resolve to also be the top hero. As BnHA unfolds, Bakugo begins to resent Deku more and more, which leads to the beginnings and development of said rivalry on a grand scale.

It would take a while to highlight every last important character on the cast beside these three, but there are a few more worth mentioning in brief due to having larger supporting roles:

Ochaco Uraraka is the first person Deku meets at the U.A. Entrance exams, and after said sequence of events, they become quick friends. Noted for her ability to manipulate the gravity of objects with her fingertips, she’s bright, kind and hard working…but also has a crush on Deku, which is low-key but quite obvious.

There’s also Tenya Iida, who despite his uptight nature, becomes close to Deku and Uraraka as well. The younger brother of the hero Ingenium, Iida looks up to his sibling and has a stringent, strict sense of honor and decorum…but there’s more to his character than meets the eye, as he has an ability that grants him great speed produced from the jets in his calves…

Gaining a great deal of relevance in Season 2 is Shoto Todoroki, the son of a very famous hero (no spoilers on that!) and another prodigy with a powerful Quirk that allows him manipulation of both ice and fire. Since he’s a walking spoiler for parts of season 2 (for those who have not seen the show) I’ll note that his resourcefulness and power are very impressive, though his level of control and personal path to walk pose their own issues for him.

Finally, I’ll mention Shigaraki again. I talked about him in my thoughts, but know he’s the major threat moving forward.

It’s a bit of a shame that this section can’t cover every last one of these characters in the show, but it’s a solid cast that translates the incredible design work of the manga well and in turn, the animation itself does wonders in bringing them to life thus far. 4.25/5 points.

Story quality: As you may have guessed from the character section, My Hero Academia’s tale is following Izuku Midoriya’s tale of “how he became the the #1 hero.” However, it’s never quite as simple as getting from point “A” to point “B” in a good to great series, and so it’s the vibrant mix of character development and different subplots converging at key moments that really makes the show’s story. It’s got a good flow and pacing for the most part; there have been gripes from some about the show’s usage of flashbacks, particularly in key moments, but this slight drawback hardly outweighs what otherwise is an enjoyable ride as heroes and villains alike gather their strength on the collision course known as “destiny.” 4/5 points.

Themes: Perhaps the most impressive themes of the series are the comprehensive exploration of “just what does it mean to be a true hero?” and the ever-well received (and in this case, well executed) message of one’s ability to always aim higher and break past their limits in a worthwhile pursuit to be great at one’s goals. There’s plenty of other more typical themes in there, from the friendship and rivalries aspect that’s typical in shonen, but the in-depth look and partial subversion of the hero genre is really very, very interesting thus far. 4/5 points.

Don’t insult the viewer: Clean-cut with just the right amount of rawness around the edges for a superhero shonen show, My Hero Academia’s an easily engrossing watch. There is some minimal fanservice, but hardly enough to warrant a deduction in the intagibles of the show (I’m looking at you, Mineta). A special note for the OST of this series, which has been fantastic up to this point and fits the essence of this world and its characters perfectly. 5/5 points.

Total Score: 22.25/25 (89%). A joy to watch unfold, My Hero Academia captures both a great sense of fun and storytelling within its immersive world; with a Season 3 coming at an undisclosed time (as of this writing) it’s a rock-solid start for a show that figures to stay on the forefront of conversations.

 

An end of September update-

Hello dear readers,

As you no doubt have noticed, I’ve been absent from writing new posts in the month of September. This is largely because I’ve begun a new program at school, and needed the time to adjust and get integrated in a new semester’s worth of coursework. The other reason however, is that I have not had the time to truly write the quality of material that I strive to always post on this blog, out of respect to you- the readers, and to my own standards. That said, I’m looking to return in October with some new material, including some seasonally-themed work, so look forward to that!

Sincerely,

Christian, aka “AniB”

 

Review: Wander Over Yonder

Take a wild wacky trip across the galaxy.

The Lowdown:

Show: Wander Over Yonder

Network/years aired: Disney Channel/XD, 2013- 2016

AniB’s thoughts: The most recent and perhaps underrated work of Craig McCracken’s career is this show- the delightfully offbeat slice of life Wander Over Yonder. Borrowing notes from classic cartoons of yesteryear and a good sense of adventure, Wander managed to carve itself out as a sort of cult hit on Disney X.D., in the midst of more celebrated works airing at the same time, namely Gravity Falls and Phineas and Ferb, and in turn, was an understated cartoon, quietly bowing out in a summer finale in 2016.

Despite its reputation as a severely overlooked show, Wander featured some legitimate vocal talent on its cast, led by Jack McBrayer as Wander, (whose other well known voice acting role was as Wreck-It Ralph’s titular game companion, Fix-It Felix in the movie of the former’s same name.) A strange “wandering hippie man” as McCracken describes him, Wander is endlessly upbeat and looking to make friends wherever he goes and however improbable the situation… and there’s something very warm about his entire concept that just works, beyond the orange fur… He is accompanied everywhere by his inseparable pal, Sylvia, who prefers to to let her fists do the talking while concealing a gentler side as well.

There was also an actual character arc in the show for main baddie-turned likable incompetent Lord Hater, who despite his odd love-hate relationship with Wander (his antithesis) stayed deep down committed to his goal of being the “the #1 villain and baddest in the universe!” Accompanying him was also one of the better animated sidekicks in a while, the single-eyed Commander Peepers, voiced by none other than Tom Kenny, as the general of Hater’s “Watchdog” Army- a group of similarly single-eyed little men with unwavering devotion, a fair amount of cowardice, a surprising number of luxuries, and perhaps most notably, woefully underutilized by their big boss- who delegated all the hard day to day details to Peepers.

 

The show’s second and final season also saw the introduction of a brand-new and very competent villain as well (who I mention about in the character grading section), and the continued zany adventures of Wander and Sylvia, as well as Hater and his minions. Both seasons feature a lot of different planets and locales, and in many ways, it’s a more modern take on the old “space age” tales of classic cartoons the show riffs off of. Instead of shiny aluminum towers, Planet X’s and little green men though, Wander creates an immensely diverse place that we all get a glimpse into, while wondering aloud if the myriad of characters in the show are missing it all as well as it passes by. There’s a lot of heart and some deeper questions sometimes lurking in the fabric of this fun production, even among goofy inane pursuits ranging from Hater’s terrible sense of romance to Wander’s seemingly inhuman ability to drop *everything* at the cry of help. Needless to say, it’s a show that’s easily accessible and truly far more than just a footnote from its time period on Disney X.D.

 


 

Animation Quality: Traditional 2-D animation, with computer shading. Wander’s animation is gorgeously classic, a wonderful rich palette with varied worlds, characters and backgrounds all done in a simple, hand-drawn style. It works very well, and in some ways is remincient of the various locales in Samurai Jack, despite the different style of show and eras. There’s a lot of charm and color, along with some neat animation techniques which really make the show come alive. 4.5/5 points.

 
Characterization: While mostly covered in the thoughts section, the show rotates around the titular Wander, a sort of wandering “hippie” who crosses the galaxy looking to help people, have fun, and promote peace; his ride and best friend Sylvia, a “zbornak” who is a tough as she is loyal, and their “frienenemies,” so to speak- Lord Hater, the self-proclaimed villainous “Greatest in the Galaxy”, his second in command Commander Peepers, and a army of one-eyed henchmen known as the Watchdogs.

(SLIGHT SPOILERS:)

As of the second and final season, Lord Dominator, a ruthless conqueror bent on destroying the galaxy, takes over the main antagonist role. Unlike Hater, she outright seeks to destroy planets in an unstoppable march that she revels in. Dominator’s personal lack of friends may have more than a little to do with her ambitions, but she’s also quite powerful herself and genuinely enjoys being evil, so there’s that.

(END SPOILERS)

Truthfully, the entire show’s cast is exaggerated and funny in their traits, but the DNA of classic Looney Tunes and Hanna-Barbera run deep through its veins, and their hijinks correspond to that sort of humor, which is well-written. For this style of show, it’s very good. 3.75/5 points.

 

 
Story quality: Episodic, with continuity. Wander at its core has the DNA of classic Western cartoons in its storytelling, and each episode is naturally its own adventure. However, there is continuity in the show; past people and place reappear, adventures are referenced that already happened, and character development, along with a loosely long-term narrative exists. There’s no arcs, so to speak, but it’s a lot of fun to watch; it’s a show that’s smart without ever taking itself too seriously, knowing its own tropes. Indeed, the conclusion of the show is both a fitting end to the wacky people and places of the show while still giving a sense that the adventure never ends… 4/5 points.

 

 
Themes: There’s a lot of nice themes wedged into episodes about friendship, love, and ultimately many other valuable life lessons. It’s a very sweet show that finely balances these ideas on its trademark humor and zaniness. However, if you’re looking for a very densely packed thematic show, you’re in the wrong place. 3.25/5 points.

 
Don’t insult the viewer: “Fun” is the best descriptor to describe Wander. Smart, classic, and something all its own, it’s a cool ride. It also uses references and tropes quite well. 5/5 points.

 

 

Total Score: 20.5/25 (82%). Craig McCracken’s show is a entertaining blend of slapstick humor, frantic storytelling, and hints of past efforts such as Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends. It is one of the better efforts at the episodic format in recent years, and is worth a watch. (You’ll also find yourself whistling that theme song all day long!)


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